PRIMAL CANINE

Dog Training, Behavior Specialist & Dog Psychology

How to Make a Leather Dog Collar

diy leather dog collar primal canine dog training

[Here's a great article we found on makezine.com, enjoy]Editor’s Note: The following DIY originally appeared in CRAFT Volume 10. Pictured above is author Ana Poe with her adorable pup Paco. Paco tragically passed away in January of 2009. RIP dear Paco. DIY Dog Collar Build a leather collar with style and substance. By Ana Poe i began working with leather seven years ago when I stumbled across it during the hunt for the perfect collar for my dog, Paco. Since I’ve never taken a class, most of the following techniques are either self-taught or passed on to me by old-time leather workers. When working with leather, remember that it falls under the same rules as wood, metal, and stone: measure twice, cut once, and when you can’t beat it, learn to work with it.

 

MATERIALS

Leather strip or piece of hide Collar template Buckle, D-ring, and rivets Water-based edge dye Leather conditioner I recommend a combination of mink oil, cream conditioner, and beeswax. Decorative studs and/or conchos Leather stamp and paints (optional) Using high-quality materials will pay off in the long run. Use brass hardware whenever possible (nickel finish is available) and start with a high-quality latigo leather. Originally used as horse tack, latigo leather is meant to tolerate sweat, dirt, and weather, and will not only stand the test of time but will look better doing so.

TOOLS

Ruler Strap cutter Mallet Tack hammer Leather scissors Small scissors Needlenose vise-grip pliers Skiver X-Acto knife Hole punch Scratch awl Screwdriver Rivet setter Edge beveler (optional) Some of these tools you may already have lying around your house. You can find the specialized tools online at tandyleatherfactory.com or at one of its many branches. If you need to speak to an expert leather worker, call up Chris Howard at the Michigan branch and tell him we sent you.

DIRECTIONS

Caution: The nature of leather tools — sharp! — means that your skin poses no serious obstacle. Use every tool appropriately and safely, and before you begin each step, watch where your hands are! dog-collar-figA.jpg Step 1: Strap-cut the hide. If you have a piece of hide, adjust the strap cutter to the width of the collar you want and run along the straight edge to create a strip from which you’ll cut the collar. You can also buy pre-cut strips from most leather suppliers. dog-collar-figB.jpg Step 2: Cut a generous length. To determine the length of leather to cut, take your dog’s exact neck measurement and add 10″. It’s a healthy measurement, and you may end up cutting off some excess, but while you can always subtract, you can never add. At both ends, crop off the corners for a finished look. dog-collar-figC.jpg Step 3: Bevel the edges (optional). Using a keen edge beveler, run the tool along the top corner of the leather to remove the edge. Repeat on all sides and ends. This step creates a more polished look and a comfortable fit for the dog. dog-collar-figD.jpg Step 4: Dye the edges. Select a water-based edge dye that matches the color of the leather you’re working with. Keep a wiping rag handy and use an applicator or specialized dispenser to cover the exposed edges with an even coat of dye. Take care not to drip over the leather, as the dye stains quickly. Step 5: Condition the leather. Taking the time to apply conditioners will extend the life of your leather goods. They can also bring an old leather product back to life. Apply mink oil and cream conditioner on a rag and, using your hand strength, work into the leather. To finish, wipe beeswax lightly onto the leather and then wipe off the excess. This last step protects the collar against water. dog-collar-figE.jpg Step 6: Mark the holes, and trim. Download the appropriate template from craftzine.com/10/doggone_collar. Take the side marked “buckle end” and slide it flush to the end of the leather. Use a scratch awl to mark the leather where indicated. For the tail end, follow the instructions on the template and line up the second hole at your dog’s exact neck size. Mark the leather at the end of the template, cut off the excess, and bevel and dye the end. dog-collar-figF.jpg Step 7: Skive the collar. Working from the suede underside of the leather, use the skiving tool to remove about half the thickness of the leather from the mark on the template to the buckle end. This step will remove bulk and make it easier for the leather to conform around the buckle. Step 8: Punch holes. The hole punch tool comes with many different head sizes, from #0 to #5. The template will tell you which size punch to use for each hole. When preparing to punch, always lay a scrap of leather underneath, as impact with a hard object can crack or bend the punch. dog-collar-figG.jpg Line up the punch, using the scratch awl mark as the center of a bulls-eye. With several firm whacks, use the mallet to depress the punch through the leather. Repeat until all holes are punched. dog-collar-figI.jpg Using an X-Acto blade, cut out the leather where indicated to create an oblong slot for the buckle. dog-collar-figJ.jpg Step 9: Add the buckle and rivets. Weave the punched leather through the buckle and fold the tail underneath. To set a rivet, push the male end of the rivet through both layers, from the bottom, and top it with the cap. dog-collar-figK.jpg Place the rivet-setting anvil on something hard, like a piece of marble. Select the appropriate anvil (it will be the slightly concave one the same size as your rivet cap) and use the mallet to set the rivet firmly. You cannot hit the rivet too hard! If you don’t set it firmly enough, the collar will fail, so if you’re not sure, tug the leather the same way your dog on a leash would, and reset the rivet if need be. Set the 2 rivets closest to the buckle first, slide on your D-ring, and set the remaining 2. Step 10: Decorate! Now comes the fun part. Select your decorations and map out their placement on the collar. Mark the leather by using the actual decoration itself (apply pressure to make a mark) or a scratch awl. For studs, it helps to lock them in a pair of needlenose vise-grips so you can easily mark both tails at once. dog-collar-figL.jpg Decorations attach to the leather in 1 of 3 ways: screw-back, rivet-back, or tails. For screw-back conchos, use a #4 or #5 hole punch, punch the hole, and then screw into place. For added security, apply a drop of threadlocker on the backing. For rivet-back decorations, use a #0 punch and the appropriate setting tools. Without machinery, setting rivet decorations securely enough for daily wear while simultaneously not damaging the decoration can be tricky, so we recommend staying away from rivet-backs if you can help it. dog-collar-figM.jpg For studs, cut parallel holes with an X-Acto blade, push the stud through the holes, turn the tails in with a screwdriver or pliers, and then gently tap with a tack hammer. Studs are an easy way to add a lot of flash to a collar, like spelling out a dog’s name, that’s sturdy enough to last. There are also a variety of leather-stamping tools on the market as well as paints and finishes, so you can stamp shapes or re-create your favorite 70s belt. Leather working can be challenging, but the reward of creating a piece of art that can potentially outlive you or your dog is worth it. Most leather workers are more than happy to share techniques and solutions if you find yourself stuck, so don’t be afraid to call on us! Note: Most leather decorations are calibrated for the thickness of leather, so if you want a vegan option, the best thing to do is start with a pre-made vegan belt that measures at least ¼” thick. Treat it like a strip of leather, as all the tools and instructions stay the same. dog-collar-closing-shot.jpg About the Author: Ana Poe is the owner of Paco Collars, maker of custom handmade leather dog collars. Ana’s been working professionally with dogs since 2001. She has a B.A. in art practice from UC Berkeley and is an all around smart cookie.

Daily Training Tips: Beginner Obedience Heel-to-Sit

primal canine bay area dog training

Here's a quick video on how we introduce the sit command to new dogs during a heel. Count comes from an amazing bloodline (Homie Blood) but was kept in a backyard most of his life, so he had no idea of the real world and when he was introduced to it he froze. We took a couple weeks to re-imprint and socialize him with the pack now he is in first steps of our training program and has come ALLLLLONG way!..

Like i tell all of my clients there is no bad dogs, there is just bad or miseducated owners. In my pack i have no clean slates or working line bred dogs, we take pound puppies and turn them into full fledged service dogs or in some cases protection dogs. This is where the Primal Canine Philosophy comes in, we re-work the nerves and train these dogs with compassion and communicate with them the way you should.

For more information on Primal Canine or to get a FREE evaluation five us a call at 408.250.0026.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeG1aT8RBqI&w=853&h=480]

DIY: Modern Dip-Dyed Rope Dog Leash

dyed rope leash bay area dog training primal canine

We found this great DIY project on Curbly.com, These type of leashes are great for your everyday dog owner and can be costly if you go and buy name brand. Enjoy,

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

Colorful rope dog leads have been all the rage in the pet accessories world lately -- and I am obsessed! But, with prices ranging anywhere from $70 to over $150, they're a little outside most people's "dog stuff" budgets. If you'd still like to get your paws on a stylish leash for your pooch (in whatever color your heart desires) without breaking the bank, give this easy DIY rope leash project a whirl!

I am head-over-heels for the rope leash look. As a visual reference, here are a few awesome shops and brands that make them.

1. Mungo & Maud 2. RESQ/CO 3. Found 4. Grey Paw (at $35, definitely the most affordable option)

Many of these use traditional nautical splicing and whipping techniques, but today we're going to employ a bit of a shortcut! (If you want to learn how to splice rope, there are tons of video tutorials on YouTube, FYI.) So, are you ready to make your own rope dog leash? Awesome. Pawesome. Here's what you'll need!

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

Materials:

  • 2 to 2 1/4 yards 3/8" thick cotton rope
  • Fabric Dye
  • (2) Rope Clamps
  • (1) Snap Hook
  • Rubber Mallet
  • Large Cooking Pot

 

The rope clamps and snap hook can be found in the rope section of your local hardware store. Finding 100% cotton rope can be a little tricky, though. I ended up finding the braided style at JoAnn's in the trim section. You can order the 3-strand style from Knot & Rope Supply for pretty cheap. (I happened to have some on hand prior to this project.)

 

 

Instructions:

1. Determine about how long you want your leash to be (anywhere from 4-6 feet is pretty standard) and cut it accordingly. Be sure to tape or tie off the ends so your rope doesn't unravel.

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

2. Soak your rope in some warm water. Meanwhile, prepare your dye according to the instructions on the bottle. You won't need very much! A bottle of RIT Liquid Dye will go a long, long way.

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

3. Now for the fun part! For an ombré/gradient/dip-dyed effect, quickly dip and remove your rope from the dye. Then, re-dip at different heights/levels, until you're happy with the gradation. Want your rope all one color? Submerge the whole rope in the dye, stirring constantly, until the desired color is reached.

Note: I made two versions of this leash using different kinds of rope and found that the 3-strand variety creates a smoother, more subtle ombré effect.

4. Remove your rope and hang it up (outside or in the garage), dark end at the top, to allow the dye to creep down the rope. You can help it along by squeezing the excess dye/water down the length of the rope.

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

5. Once you're happy with the way the gradient is looking, rinse the rope in cold water until the water runs clear -- or -- use some RIT Dye Fixative before you rinse out the rope if you want to super-seal the color.

6. Allow the rope to dry thoroughly. This may take up to 24 hours.

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

7. Now that your rope is dry, it's time to attach the clamps and snap hook. Decide which end you want to place the hook. Feed the end of the rope through the ring then fold the rope over, creating a small loop.

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

8. Place the clamp on a flat surface with the prongs facing up. Lay the base of the rope loop inside the clamp, between the prongs. With a hammer or rubber mallet, hammer all four prongs securely over the rope.

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

9. On the other end, fold the rope over to create a 6-7" loop (bigger or smaller depending on how big your hands are and what feels comfortable to you). Then, repeat step 8.

Now, after you've attached the rope clamps, you could call it a day -- you have a perfectly functional leash at this point. (Heck, you could skip the dyeing altogether and just attach the clamps and snap hook and -- BAM -- you'd have a leash.) If you really want to take this project into über-stylish territory, though, you'll want to add some finishing touches and cover those ugly clamps up!

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

There are multiple ways to cover the clamps: you could wrap them in twine/yarn/string/leather cording/etc. etc. I chose to use up some leftover leather (from this project) and create a sleeve with some colorful stitching. If you'd like to do the same, read on!

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

Materials for Creating a Leather Clamp Cover:

  • Leather
  • Craft Knife
  • Embroidery Floss
  • #18 Darning Needle
  • Ruler
  • Hammer
  • Self-Healing Cutting Mat

 

 

Instructions:

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

1. Cut a strip of leather about 2.25" wide, or wide enough to cover the length of the clamp.

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

2. From this strip, cut two pieces of leather, both about 2.5" long or long enough to wrap around the clamp.

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

3. Soak one of the leather pieces in warm water until it becomes soft and malleable. Stretch it out a bit then pat dry.

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

4. Fold the leather over. Take a hammer and your darning needle and create some small stitch guides/holes anywhere from 1/8 to 1/4 inch apart. You only need a few light taps from the hammer, don't go crazy.

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

5. Lay the leather on a flat surface, then position and place the clamp on top. Cut a length of embroidery floss and tie a knot at the end. Anchor the floss to the rope itself by looping and tying the thread a few times.

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

6. Stitch the two ends of the leather together with a simple whip stitch, pulling tightly. When you reach the end, anchor the floss to the rope as before. Cut the thread.

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

7. Repeat steps 3-6 for the other clamp. Allow the leather to dry out completely (it'll tighten up around the clamp as it dries) and you're done!

Now for some pretty, pretty pictures!

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

And, of course, obligatory photos of my dogs:

 

Photo: Capree Kimball

 

Happy leash making!

Introducing a New Dog to Your Pack - Video

introducing a new dog primal canine dog training san jose

The introduction of a new dog to a home with existing dogs can be a bit tricky and should be taken very seriously. When introducing a new dog to your current pack there are a few things to take into consideration.. 1. Are you your current dog(s) pack leader? - A dog without a strong stable pack leader will feel the need to go out of their way to protect the pack and may lash out on the new addition. Also a dog that is not sure in their leader will under go a huge amount of stress which is not good for your dog health.

2. Do you use a crate?- A crate is the safest way to introduce a dog into a household with a current dog or dogs, this way your newest member will feel safe and secure in their crate while your dogs can see and smell them without any threat of a fight.

3. Does your current dog(s) display dog aggression?- This maybe one of the most crucial parts to take into consideration and is best to be dealt with before you add a new dog into your house. The best way to deal with this is to contact your local dog trainer for some advice and training classes, remember not all dogs have to like each other but ALL dogs must display manners when around other dogs.

There is much more to add to this short post, so if you're interested in adding a new dog to your pack please contact us at info@primalcanine.com or to set up your FREE evaluation please contact us at 408.915.6173

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJ3uBkyASdE&w=853&h=480]

45 Animals That Are Pumped For The 4th Of July

pit bull 4th of july primal canine dog training

We found these great pictures on buzz feed.com and wanted to share them with you.

1. This dog that’s draped in the American flag.

This dog that's draped in the American flag.

Source: i.imgur.com

2. This bulldog with giant American flag pants.

This bulldog with giant American flag pants.

Source: i.imgur.com

3. This guinea pig that’s trying to be all that he can be.

This guinea pig that's trying to be all that he can be.

Source: i.imgur.com

4. This patriotic dachshund.

This patriotic dachshund.

Source: i.imgur.com

5. This hedgehog that’s showing his true patriotic colors.

This hedgehog that's showing his true patriotic colors.

6. This adorable horse with an American flag bow.

This adorable horse with an American flag bow.

Source: i.imgur.com

7. This cat complete with red, white and blue bandanna.

This cat complete with red, white and blue bandanna.

Source: i.imgur.com

8. This patriotic pair of dogs.

This patriotic pair of dogs.

Source: i.imgur.com

9. This puppy that’s doing his best to wave Old Glory.

This puppy that's doing his best to wave Old Glory.

Source: i.imgur.com

10. These two bloodhounds.

These two bloodhounds.

Source: vh1.com

11. This parrot.

This parrot.

12. This red, white, and blue dog.

This red, white, and blue dog.

Although he kind of looks like the French tricolor in reverse, its heart is in the right place.

Source: vh1.com

13. This chihuahua with an epic ‘murica hat.

This chihuahua with an epic 'murica hat.

Source: omtimes.com

14. This cat that covers itself with patriotism.

This cat that covers itself with patriotism.

15. This yellow lab.

This yellow lab.

16. Even this dolphin is getting in on all the 4th of July America feels.

Even this dolphin is getting in on all the 4th of July America feels.

17. This musical patriot cat.

This musical patriot cat.

18. This llama.

This llama.

19. THIS HORSE!

THIS HORSE!

20. This cat that just can’t get enough America paraphernalia

This cat that just can't get enough America paraphernalia

21. This Uncle Sam cat.

This Uncle Sam cat.

22. This kitten that’s just screaming about how much it loves America.

This kitten that's just screaming about how much it loves America.

23. This dog that’s resting in a sea of American flags.

This dog that's resting in a sea of American flags.

Source: aldf.org

24. This dog who got its nails done for the 4th.

This dog who got its nails done for the 4th.

Source: mike2.com

25. Pigs, too, can show their patriotism.

Pigs, too, can show their patriotism.

Source: teen.com

26. This cat who, by the look on its face, is ready to defend the USA from all who would threaten it.

This cat who, by the look on its face, is ready to defend the USA from all who would threaten it.

27. This bulldog who’s readying itself for a transatlantic flight to prove America’s dominance.

This bulldog who's readying itself for a transatlantic flight to prove America's dominance.

28. This dog with America shades.

This dog with America shades.

29. Another dachshund, this one is ready to fight for our freedoms.

Another dachshund, this one is ready to fight for our freedoms.

30. This America-cat.

This America-cat.

31. This bulldog that’s just elated to be holding an American flag.

This bulldog that's just elated to be holding an American flag.

32. This happy trio of dogs.

This happy trio of dogs.

Source: sdhumane.org

33. This adorable little guy who won’t let his disability stop him from joining in on the 4th of July fun.

This adorable little guy who won't let his disability stop him from joining in on the 4th of July fun.

34. This dude (or dudette).

This dude (or dudette).

35. This puppy that’s just challenging you to slight America in his presence.

This puppy that's just challenging you to slight America in his presence.

36. This America-star dog.

This America-star dog.

37. This ferret.

This ferret.

Source: vh1.com

38. And his buddy.

And his buddy.

Source: vh1.com

39. This lizard.

This lizard.

Source: vh1.com

40. This ever-vigilant cat.

This ever-vigilant cat.

41. This sheep.

This sheep.

42. This squirrel that just can’t get enough of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

This squirrel that just can't get enough of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

43. That squirrel’s friend who’s posing with the flag.

That squirrel's friend who's posing with the flag.

44. And their mutual friend who’s cheering them on while wearing an America hat.

And their mutual friend who's cheering them on while wearing an America hat.

45. And last but not least, this poodle.

And last but not least, this poodle.

TDIF!

PRIMAL CANINE BAY AREA DOG TRAINING TDIF

PRIMAL CANINE BAY AREA DOG TRAINING TDIF

DIY Designer Rope Leash

designer rope leash primal canine dog training

from - www.ammothedachshund.com So mom noticed lately that I’ve been ooh and ahhing over this trendy rope leash from Mungo & Maud. And while I’ll always think it’s super stylin’ – $110 for a new leash for me just wasn’t in the budget.

Instead, on a recent trip to a tack shop in Delaware – mom came up with a plan to make me my very own Rope Leash. For $5!

D.I.Y. $5 Rope Dog Leash

Supplies: cotton horse lead rope, hammer, rope clamp

Step One: You will need to obtain a cotton horse leadrope. I got mine at a horse tack shop in Delaware for $3. You can also get one online at most tack supply places like here. Or check your local horse supply store.

Step Two: You will need to buy a clamp to make the end of your rope into a handle. I bought a package of two (you know, incase I need a rope leash for my best pal Trooper) for $4.39 (about $2 for each one) at the local hardware store. Most hardware stores should carry them in the rope section, and you can find some online here.

Step 3: Figure out how big of a handle you want at the other end and adjust your rope into the clamp accordingly. It also helps to have a cute little dachshund around for supervision.

Step 4: You will need the help of your dad to hammer the clamp shut around the rope.

Then Tada! You are ready for your next walk in your stylish dog leash!

If you don’t have access to a horse lead rope, you can also use any cotton rope. You will just need too metal rope clamps and a snap for the end – all supplies can be found at the local hardware store.

Yeah, you know you want to beg your mom or dad to make you one of these bad boys!

I think I need one of these in every color! Almost as good as the real thing…..

Rope Leash from Mungo & Maud

The Evolution Of The Dog - Infographic

primal canine presidential dogs

We found this infographic on the dog evolution pretty interesting, hope you like it! Enjoy, Like what you see? leave us a comment below.

evolution of dogs primal canine dog training

TDIF

TDIF primal canine bay area dog training

TDIF primal canine bay area dog training

38 Brilliant Dog-Care Ideas To Make Your Life Easier

puppy tooth brush primal canine dog training

We found this great post from www.Buzzfeed.com on Dog-Care ideas that you can easily do yourself, enjoy!!

1. If you have a hard time brushing your dog’s teeth, squeeze some enzymatic doggie toothpaste onto a Nylabone or rope toy and let your pooch go to town on it.

 

If you have a hard time brushing your dog's teeth, squeeze some enzymatic doggie toothpaste onto a Nylabone or rope toy and let your pooch go to town on it.

Source: reddit.com

2. Make your own pill pockets when you need to feed your dog some medicine.

 

Make your own pill pockets when you need to feed your dog some medicine.

This is a copycat version of the kind made by Greenies.

3. Learn how to make your own chicken jerky.

 

Learn how to make your own chicken jerky.

It’s a healthier alternative to the store-bought kind. Get the directions here.

Source: imgur.com

4. A carabiner is a quick and easy way to leash your dog.

 

A carabiner is a quick and easy way to leash your dog.

Source: imgur.com
 

Source: imgur.com

5. Got a lot of studying to do? Here’s how to read and play with your dog at the same time:

 

Got a lot of studying to do? Here's how to read and play with your dog at the same time:

Put a rope toy around your foot.

Source: i.imgur.com

6. Use baking soda to get dog urine out of carpet.

 

Use baking soda to get dog urine out of carpet.

If you don’t happen to have a product like Nature’s Miracle on hand (maybe you’re traveling or at a friend’s house), pour some baking soda over the spot, let it sit, and then sweep or vacuum it up.

Source: care2.com

7. Put a ball in your dog’s food bowl if he or she eats too fast.

 

Put a ball in your dog's food bowl if he or she eats too fast.

They’ll be forced to move the ball around to get to all the food.

8. For a dog who loves to tear apart stuffed animals, make a durable activity ball with a Hol-ee rubber ball, scraps of fabric, and treats.

 

For a dog who loves to tear apart stuffed animals, make a durable activity ball with a Hol-ee rubber ball, scraps of fabric, and treats.

Once your dog has removed all of the fabric from the ball, you can stuff the scraps right back in!

9. If your dog isn’t feeling well, add some low-sodium chicken broth to the drinking water.

 

If your dog isn't feeling well, add some low-sodium chicken broth to the drinking water.

10. To remove pet hair from upholstery, dampen a rubber glove and run your gloved hand over it.

 

To remove pet hair from upholstery, dampen a rubber glove and run your gloved hand over it.

The latex/rubber will attract the hair.

11. Use a teapot to rinse dogs off in the bathtub without getting water and soap in their eyes.

 

Use a teapot to rinse dogs off in the bathtub without getting water and soap in their eyes.

Source: geekfill.com

12. A shower caddy makes a great storage solution for all your doggie stuff.

 

A shower caddy makes a great storage solution for all your doggie stuff.

13. Use a plastic pitcher to store and dispense dog food.

 

Use a plastic pitcher to store and dispense dog food.

It takes less time and keeps the food fresher. I use the MUJI rice storage dispenser, which comes with a handy measuring cup.

14. If you’ve got a teething pup who loves destroying cords, spritz bitter apple spray onto a paper towel and wipe the cord with it.

 

If you've got a teething pup who loves destroying cords, spritz bitter apple spray onto a paper towel and wipe the cord with it.

This covers more surface area and wastes less product than simply spraying the entire thing.

15. Make an ice lick by freezing toys, bones, and chicken broth into a cake mold.

 

Make an ice lick by freezing toys, bones, and chicken broth into a cake mold.

Source: pinterest.com

16. Invest in an escape-prevention harness if you have a small dog and a fenced-in yard.

 

Invest in an escape-prevention harness if you have a small dog and a fenced-in yard.

A little silly looking, but it’s safer than risking a runaway dog. Buy it here.

Source: hammacher.com

17. Run a dryer sheet over your dog’s fur when there’s a storm — chances are, they aren’t freaked out about the storm but the static electricity built up in their fur.

 

Run a dryer sheet over your dog's fur when there's a storm — chances are, they aren't freaked out about the storm but the static electricity built up in their fur.

According to Martha, this should work at least 50% of the time.

18. On a hot summer day, fill up an inflatable pool with water and ice.

 

On a hot summer day, fill up an inflatable pool with water and ice.

Source: i1.kwejk.pl

19. Make a dog-walking station for the entryway if you have more than one dog.

 

Make a dog-walking station for the entryway if you have more than one dog.

See how this is done here.

20. Dilute your dog shampoo to make it last longer and easier to apply.

 
 

Fill the bottom of an empty shampoo bottle about ¼ inch. Fill up the rest slowly with warm water.

21. If you have a small dog, cutting up a lamb roll into tiny pieces is a cost-effective way to make healthy, bite-sized training treats.

 

If you have a small dog, cutting up a lamb roll into tiny pieces is a cost-effective way to make healthy, bite-sized training treats.

A 1 lb. roll costs $6.98. Cut it up into the desired size, store most of it in a ziplock bag in the freezer, and leave the rest on the counter for immediate use.

22. Make your own hammock-style car seat cover.

 

Make your own hammock-style car seat cover.

The hammock style keeps the dog from getting hurt if he or she falls during any sudden stops or starts. Get the pattern here.

Source: ex-scapes.com

23. Print out and keep this handy chart of what foods your dog should NOT be given.

 

Print out and keep this handy chart of what foods your dog should NOT be given.

24. Make your own flea shampoo.

 

Make your own flea shampoo.

1 cup Dawn, 1 cup vinegar, and 1 quart of warm water. Massage in and let it sit for five minutes. According to one testimonial, “The fleas just floated in the water and died and best of all little Libby did not have any reactions at all to the process.”

Source: food.com

25. For easy tick removal, apply a glob of liquid soap to a cotton ball and swab the tick with the cotton ball for a few seconds.

 

For easy tick removal, apply a glob of liquid soap to a cotton ball and swab the tick with the cotton ball for a few seconds.

The tick should come out on its own and be stuck to the cotton ball when you remove it.

26. Remove pet hair from carpet with a squeegee.

 

Remove pet hair from carpet with a squeegee.

27. An inexpensive and easy summer treat for dogs: Cut up apples in chicken broth and freeze in an ice cube tray.

 

An inexpensive and easy summer treat for dogs: Cut up apples in chicken broth and freeze in an ice cube tray.

28. If you have an older dog with tooth troubles, add a little water or chicken broth to his or her kibble and microwave for 20-30 seconds.

 

If you have an older dog with tooth troubles, add a little water or chicken broth to his or her kibble and microwave for 20-30 seconds.

This softens the kibble and makes the food much easier to chew.

Source: instagram.com

29. Teach your dog to file his or her own nails by attaching sandpaper to a piece of wood.

 

Teach your dog to file his or her own nails by attaching sandpaper to a piece of wood.

Apparently, dogs can be trained to use a scratching posts just like cats! Get the directions for how to build a giant dog nail file here.

30. Read your dog’s body language.

 

Read your dog's body language.

31. Sprinkle parsley on your dog’s food for fresher breath.

 

Sprinkle parsley on your dog's food for fresher breath.

32. Here’s an ingenious leash that has a built-in waste-bag dispenser and a compartment for keys, cards, phone, and treats.

 

Here's an ingenious leash that has a built-in waste-bag dispenser and a compartment for keys, cards, phone, and treats.

$39.99 from Fozzy Dog.

33. Instead of buying special Kong stuffing, stuff a Kong with cheese cubes and place in the microwave for five seconds.

 

Instead of buying special Kong stuffing, stuff a Kong with cheese cubes and place in the microwave for five seconds.

The cheese will melt just enough to stick to the inside of the Kong.

34. Turn an empty pancake-syrup bottle into a portable squirtable water bottle.

 

Turn an empty pancake-syrup bottle into a portable squirtable water bottle.

Use a carabiner to attach it to a belt loop for a long hike.

35. It’s certainly unpleasant to take your dog outside when it’s snowing or raining, but don’t forget that dogs’ paws are just as sensitive to heat as human skin.

 

It's certainly unpleasant to take your dog outside when it's snowing or raining, but don't forget that dogs' paws are just as sensitive to heat as human skin.

On hot summer days, walk your dogs before 9 a.m. or after 8 p.m. — or walk them only in shady or grassy/dirt areas.

Source: pinterest.com

36. Have an extra kitchen drawer? Use it as a dog food holder.

 

Have an extra kitchen drawer? Use it as a dog food holder.

Source: bhg.com

37. Print out this guide and bring it with you when dog food/treat shopping.

 

Print out this guide and bring it with you when dog food/treat shopping.

38. Possibly the best use of old jeans ever: a lap pillow.

 

Possibly the best use of old jeans ever: a lap pillow.

Stuff an old pair of jeans with stuffing to simulate a human lap that smells just like you!

TDIF!

TDIF PRIMAL CANINE BAY AREA DOG TRAINING

TDIF PRIMAL CANINE BAY AREA DOG TRAINING

DIY Monkey Paw Dog Toy

DIY DOG TOYS PRIMAL CANINE SAN JOSE DOG TRAINERS

STEP 1. monkey paw rope dog toy primal canine bay area dog training

Rope: At least 10.5 feet of 3/8" diamond braid rope -- about 4.5' for the monkey fist knot and 3 feet (X2) for the braid on each end. It's better to start with a much longer piece of rope, tie/position the monkey fist knot, and then trim off the long side. Also, forming the monkey first takes more rope (~6'), which is then tightened down to 4.5'.

Scissors or a sharp knife to cut the rope (Be carefull!)

Lighter to melt the rope ends, to prevent fraying.

STEP 2.

MONKEY PAW KNOT BAY AREA DOG TRAINING PRIMAL CANINE

A monkey fist knot is basically three (or more) turns of rope, three more turns around the first three, and a final set of three more turns locking them all together.

Two good sites (with pictures) of how to make a monkey first knot are: http://animatedknots.com/monkeysfist/ and http://www.igkt.net/beginners/monkeys-fist.php

Start about 10 feet from the end of the rope -- this'll give you about 6' for forming the knot + 3' for the end braid + 1' for tightening...

The initial knot has to be pretty loose, otherwise you'll never be able to feed the last three loops through the knot.

To tighten the knot, start with the rope at one end of the knot. Almost as if you were trying to untie the knot, push/pull the rope into the knot, creating a loop. Following the path of the rope, push/pull the loop through the entire knot, pulling the loops tighter as you go.

Cut/trim the rope as needed to end up with a monkey-fist knot in the middle of two 3' ends of rope.

STEP 3.

DOG ROPE TOY PRIMAL CANINE SAN JOSE DOG TRAINING

I like to remove some of the rope core before fusing the ends of the rope. Pull the braided covering back from the end, exposing the core. Cut off an inch or so of the core. Pull the braided covering back over the end of the core. Use the lighter to fuse the covering together.

STEP 4.

PRIMAL CANINE DIY DOG TOYS

DIY ROPE DOG DOG TOY PRIMAL CANINE DOG TRAINNG

PRIMAL CANINE BAY AREA DOG TRAINING

You could stop here, but making a braid knot out of each end of the rope makes a better/thicker handle for the toy. A braid knot is a way of braiding a single rope. See http://www.layhands.com/Knots/Knots_Decorative.htm#BraidLoop one end around twice to form the three strands you'll be braiding (see the picture).Start braiding the three strands near the monkey first knot. As you braid, the other end of the rope will become tangled -- after a few plaits, stop to untangle the ends, then continue braiding.

STEP 5.

MONKEY PAW DOG TOY DONE DIY PRIMAL CANINE SAN JOSE DOG TRANINGI

Make a braid knot on the other end of the rope, and you're done!

DIY Banana & Peanut Butter Pupsicles

diy pupsicle primal canine dog training

diy pupsicle primal canine dog training Banana and peanut butter frozen dog treat popsicles.

Ingredients: 32 ounces of plain yogurt, 2 tablespoons of peanut butter, 2 tablespoons of honey, ⅓ cup of water, 1 large banana, Crunch ‘n Clean Dog Biscuits, Dixie cups

Directions: This one’s so good that any human may want to try it. Take yogurt, peanut butter, honey, water and the banana (chopped) and place them in a blender or food processor. Purée ingredients together then pour into Dixie cups. Stand dog biscuits in the cups of purée like you would a popsicle stick and then place them in the freezer. Your dog will love you for your culinary creations. They make the perfect after-walk snack or dessert before bed. If you’ve got kids, they might enjoy setting up a lemonade stand variation near the sidewalk for all those thirsty dog-walkers and overheated pooches!

via - http://blog.hartz.com

warning - Please keep in mind your dogs size with these treats and make them accordingly, some dogs may try to swallow if not sized properly. 

Daily Training: Mixing up the SIT command - VIDEO

primal canine dog training youtube

Here's a quick video of how you can mix in some basic obedience into your daily walks. These drills show your dog that no matter the time or place, they must pay attention. Want to learn how to properly communicate with your pup and become the leader of your pack? give us a call today and set up your FREE evaluation 408.915.6173.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBbWl0wOVkk?rel=0&w=853&h=480]

19 DIY Projects For Dog Lovers

primal canine dog training puzzle toy

via Barkpost.com What happens when you combine two of the greatest things in the world, crafts and pups?   Immediate explosions of awesomeness, that’s what. Make one of these projects below for your furry friend or your dog-obsessed friend! (Main image via Simmer Till Done.)

DIY dog bed

1. DIY Suitcase Dog Bed: Is your pup’s bed an eyesore in your home? Try making one from a vintage suitcase! Click here for the tutorial.

diy dog bookends

2. DIY Dog Bookends With a couple of plastic dog figurines, two blocks of wood, some spray paint, and a bit of superglue, you can make these stylish dog bookends! Image via House of Fifty

diy dog treat

3. Dehydrated Sweet Potatoes: Want your pup to have a healthy, all-natural treat? These dehydrated sweet potatoes are just the thing you need! Click for the tutorial.

DIy dog treat

4. Chicken Broth Ice Cubes: Mix it up in the treat department and freeze some chicken or beef broth in ice cubes! Image viaFunnyFur.

dog food on chair

5. Chair Dog Dish Holders Does your pup make a mess during dinnertime? Solve that problem by getting the bowls off the ground! Image via Nest Full of Eggs.

DIy dog toy

6. DIY Denim Dog Toy: Want a sturdy and cheap toy that your dog will have a hard time destroying? Try this knotted denim toy! See the tutorial on Instructables.

dog hanger

7. Dog Hangers: Want to spice up the rack in your closet? Print off a photo of your pup and attach it to a flat hanger with Mod Podge or glue! Image via Incredible Things.

dog car seat

8. Car Seat Protector Love taking your pup for rides but hate the mess of hair that is left behind? Make this easy seat protector! See the tutorial here.

DIy dog treat

9. Pumpkin Peanut Butter Pup Treats: Did you know pumpkin soothes your pups stomach? Make these special (and easy!) treats for your pup with a bellyache. Click here for the recipe.

DIy dog shampoo

10. DIY Dog Shampoo: There are many different kinds of dog shampoos to buy in the store, but did you know you can also make it? Check out the tutorial here.

DIy dog food holder

11. Hidden Dog Bowls: Hate the way your pup’s dishes look on the floor? You can creatively stash them away in an old dresser drawer! See more here.

DIy dog treat puzzle

12. DIY Dog Treat Puzzle: Tips on how to make a puzzle toy out of a tennis ball! See how to make it here!

DIy dog sweater

13. DIY Dog Sweater: Have an old sweater lying around? Turn it into something that’ll keep your pup warm! Clickhere for the tutorial.

DIy dog silhouette

14. DIY Dog Silhouette: Are the walls in your home a bit bare? Liven them up with a silhouette of your pup!Tutorial here.

15. Tiny Plush Pup: Make these tiny little pups yourself with this tutorial! Makes a great gift. :) Click here for the directions.

dog popsicle

16. Pup Popsicle: Freeze your dog’s favorite toys into a bucket and watch them spend hours licking away to find them. (Good for hydration, too!) :) Image via ActiveDogToys.

diy dog necklace

17. Plastic Dog Necklace: Make a cute necklace with a chain and a little plastic dog! Inspired by a Modcloth necklace. Tutorial here.

t shirt dog toy

18. T-Shirt Dog Toy: How to make a tug toy out of old t-shirts, on theBarkPost!

19. DIY Dog Pillow: Snuggle with the likeness of your pup when your pup won’t snuggle. ;) Make a pillow replica with the tutorial here.

DIY Dog Treats - Coconut Clusters!!

diy dog treats primal canine

easy homemade dog treats Ingredients:

  • 3 tbsp whole wheat flour (see note below)
  • 1/4 cup, plus 1 tablespoon applesauce, unsweetened
  • 1/4 cup milk, low or fat free (see note above about milk substitutions)
  • 1/2 cup shredded coconut, sweetened
  • 1 1/2 cups rolled oats

 

Instructions:

  1. Mix the first four ingredients together in a large bowl.
  2. Slowly add the rolled oats, about a 1/2 cup at a time. The mixture may be too loose (or dry) to clump together. If that is the case, gradually add one tablespoon of applesauce at a time. Check the mixture by squeezing a small cluster in your hand. If it does not stick together, add one more tbsp of applesauce.
  3. Scoop coconut clusters with a cookie scooper. Then, with damp hands, press into a cluster shape.
  4. Place on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.
  5. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

 

Storing & Yield: This easy homemade dog treats recipe for coconut clusters can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks and can be frozen for up to 3 months. For more tips on dog treat and dog food storage, be sure to review our page of helpful hints. The yield is 32, 1 1/2" flat clusters.

Tips & Techniques

 

  • Wheat Flour - If your dog has a wheat allergy, you can make your own oat flour. You can do this by using a food processor. Grind approximately 1/4 cup of rolled oats to make at least 3 tablespoons.
  • Cookie Cutters - You can make these coconut clusters into shapes by using a dog cookie cutter. Pack the mixture tightly into your choice of cookie cutters and place them on a lined cookie sheet. Refrigerate for about 2 hours.
  • Sheet Pan - You will need to fit these homemade dog treats in the refrigerator, so be sure to use a sheet pan, or other flat pan with a ridge, to cool these treats.
  • Toasting Coconut - Decorate your coconut clusters with a light sprinkle of toasted coconut flakes. Heat your oven to 350° F. Spread a thin layer of coconut on a baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes. It may need longer, but be careful, coconut goes from white to dark brown very quickly. Just check it often after the first 5 minutes.

 

10 DIY Dog Toys You Can Make for Pennies

diy dog toys primal canine dog training
via - wisebread.com

Dogs. These days, it seems like man’s best friend is an even better friend to the retail outlets. If you can think of a dog accessory or toy, it’s out there, and often at a whopping price tag. I sometimes scratch my head in the aisles of Pet Smart and PetCo, thinking “Really, $8 for a tennis ball and a white cord? Wow, you really can get money for old rope!” (See also:Homemade Dog Food: Recipe and Cost)

So I looked around for ideas that I could make at home quickly, easily, and without spending more than a couple of bucks on any one toy. Ideally I was looking for toys I could make without having to buy anything. And as my big pooch doesn't know the difference between brand new and homemade, all I really had to do was make sure she liked playing with them.

It's worth noting that although socks and jeans are mentioned in here, it's best not to use ones that have been worn already. You don't want to associate your scent with something the dog is allowed to chew, or you could be in for a world of ravaged clothing and shoes. Socks can be picked up very cheap, as can jeans, from your local Goodwill or second-hand store. If you must use an old sock or piece of old clothing, try soaking it in something that will eliminate any smells.

Anyway, here are the winners, in no particular order.

1. The Sock ‘n’ Ball

You will need:

  • 1 sturdy sock
  • 1 old tennis ball

Place the ball inside the sock to the toe-end, and then tie a knot just above the ball to seal it inside. Probably the cheapest, easiest, and handiest DIY pet toy you can make.

2. The Snack Sock

You will need:

  • 2 sturdy socks
  • Small dog treats

Place the snacks inside one sock and then ball it up (the usual way you do when you put socks in a drawer). Then, put it inside another sock and tie a knot in the sock to seal it inside. Your pup will smell the snacks inside and love the challenge of getting them out.

Dog with toy

3. The Rope Ball

You will need:

  • A piece of old rope
  • 1 tennis ball

Drill or cut a hole in each side of the ball, big enough for your piece of rope to squeeze through. Put the rope through it until the ball is central, and tie knots either side of the ball to keep it in place. Tie knots at the ends of the rope for grip. You now have a killer tug-of-war toy that is also good for fetch and chewing.

4. Kitchen-Towel Braids

You will need:

  • 1 old kitchen towel

Take your old, gnarly kitchen towels and put them to good use. Cut two slits along the length of a towel, equidistant from each other, and stop cutting about an inch from the top. Then braid the towel as you would hair. Knot the loose ends and you have a tough dog rope toy that’s way cheaper than the ones in the stores.

For a tougher toy, or for bigger dogs, braid three complete towels together and tie the ends or sew them up. NOTE: Old jeans can be used to make an even hardier braid.

5. The Empty Cuddly Toy

You will need:

  • 1 old cuddly toy (bit obvious?)

Don’t buy one of those expensive dog toys that look like a Build-a-Bear before it got stuffed. Just take an old stuffed toy (one that your kid doesn’t want any more, or buy one for pennies at Goodwill) and remove all the stuffing. Then sew it back up. My dog loves her unstuffed raccoon. She’s had it for years.

6. One Big Knot

You will need:

  • 1 long strip of fabric

Tie a knot in the center of the fabric. Then a knot around that one. And repeat the process until you have one giant knot. Cut off the excess from the ends, and roll it for your dog for hours of chewing madness.

Option: When you’re done, soak the knot in water (or beef stock if you’re feeling generous) and put it in the freezer. If your dog’s like mine, chewing at the ice will make it extra fun.

7. Milk-Bottle Madness

You will need:

Remove the plastic cap and throw it away. Put a dozen or so treats inside and then give it to the dog. Your pooch will bite and scratch and throw around that bottle until the last treat has fallen out, which could take hours.

8. Garden Hose Hoopla

You will need:

  • 1 piece of old garden hose
  • 1 small stick or branch

This one is easy-peasy. Take a section of garden hose and put a 3-inch long piece of branch in one end. It must fit very snugly. Curve the hose around and put the open end over the exposed piece of branch. You now have a great throwing hoop.

9. Crackling Sock

You will need:

  • 1 empty plastic bottle, small
  • 1 sock

Another very simple but effective toy. First, take the cap off of your plastic bottle and throw it away (it's a choking hazard) Now squeeze all of the air out. Put this inside of an old sock and tie a knot in the end of the sock to keep it in place. The sound of the crackling plastic, and the texture, will be something your pup will go nuts for.

10. Cardboard Tubular

You will need:

  • 1 cardboard tube (the center of a roll of kitchen towel)
  • Dog treats
  • Duct tape

Flatten one end of the cardboard roll and seal it up with duct tape. Pour some of your dog's favorite treats inside. Flatten the other end and seal it up. Now wrap the whole thing in duct tape for strength. Your dog will love the rattling sound and try for ages to get the treats out.

If you don't want to use treats, or have none available, simply flatten the tube and wrap it all in duct tape. This makes a good alternative to those rawhide chews.

Those are the top ten toys of my pet pooch Zoe. Do you have any great ideas for cheap dog toys? Let us know.

Additional photo credit: Cogdog

DIY BACON PUPSICLE!! GOOD SUMMER TREAT!!

BACON TREATS PRIMAL CANINE DOG TRAINING

courtesy of - www.kirbythedorkie.com

We found this homemade treat recipe online and figured with summer coming, this would be a good homemade treat for your pups! enjoy.

Kirby devoured these! I also like bacon, however, I am declaring these strictly for the dogs!

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup plain yogurt
  • 4 oz cup cinnamon applesauce
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 3 Tbsp maple syrup*
  • 3 oz bag real bacon bits

Preparation Instructions:

1.  In a measuring cup with spout thoroughly mix together all of the ingredients except the bacon.

2.  Stir in the bacon.

3.  Pour the mixture into molds or ice cube trays.

4.  Cover with plastic wrap and let freeze for 4 to 6 hours.

Twist to remove.  If they won't come out easily hold bottom of molds under cool running water and then twist.

* I used real maple syrup.  Pancake syrup would have too many added ingredients.

 

Choke Hazard: PLEASE monitor your dogs when giving them Pupsicles! Alternatively, make sure they are very small, at least the first time out.

DIY Bachelor Dog Treats

diy dog treats primal canine dog treats

-jenn garbee /laweekly diy dog treats primal canine dog treats

 

Bachelor Dog Treats From: Sherry Yard. Note: Yard suggests small cookie cutters such as this 3-inch dog bone, but you can use larger cutters and bake the cookies a few minutes longer. She also notes that her dog has a highly trained palette and prefers Wildflower honey (She's joking, of course; there is all of 1 tablespoon of honey in these cookies.). Yield: About 3 dozen small cookies

4 eggs, divided (2 for the dough, 2 for the wash) 1 ounce vegetable oil 1 tablespoon honey 8 ounces chicken stock 10 ounces whole wheat flour 5 ounces all-purpose flour 3 ounces cornmeal 1 cup peanut butter

1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. In a large bowl, whisk together two of the eggs, the oil and honey. Whisk in the chicken stock.

2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the whole wheat flour, AP flour and cornmeal. With the mixer on medium speed, slowly pour in the chicken stock mixture, then add the peanut butter. Mix until the dough comes together, about 1 minute.

3. Divide the dough in half. Roll out each ball of dough approximately ½ inch thick. Cut into desired shapes using small (3 to 4-inch) cookie cutters. Place on baking sheets sprayed with cooking oil.

4. Whisk the remaining two eggs and brush the egg wash lightly over the cookies. Allow to dry for 10 minutes and brush with the egg wash a second time (the second wash is optional, but gives the cookies a darker brown color). Bake until golden brown, about 15 minutes, depending on the size of the cookies.