PRIMAL CANINE

Dog Training, Behavior Specialist & Dog Psychology

From The Nose To The Tail: Keeping Your Pet Healthy - Infographic

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When raising your fur-kid its very important to not overlook the small things like food quality, grooming and waste.. We found this great infographic on visual.ly and thought we would share it with you.

Like what you see? comment below and let us know what you think.

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10 Reasons Nothings Better Than Coming Home to your Pets

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1. You’ve just had a long day of work

10 Reasons Nothing's Better Than Coming Home To Your Pet

2. So they’ve gotten the couch nice and warm for you

10 Reasons Nothing's Better Than Coming Home To Your Pet

3. And all they want to do is cuddle

10 Reasons Nothing's Better Than Coming Home To Your Pet

4. They’ve kept the house organized

10 Reasons Nothing's Better Than Coming Home To Your Pet

5. They understand that you might need some time for yourself

10 Reasons Nothing's Better Than Coming Home To Your Pet

6. And they’ll stay out of your hair if you do

10 Reasons Nothing's Better Than Coming Home To Your Pet

7. But they’ve been waiting patiently for you all day

10 Reasons Nothing's Better Than Coming Home To Your Pet

8. So they’d like to hang out with you

10 Reasons Nothing's Better Than Coming Home To Your Pet

Via: pbh2.com

9. Because they’ll do anything to be with you

10 Reasons Nothing's Better Than Coming Home To Your Pet

10. And they’re always happy to see you.

10 Reasons Nothing's Better Than Coming Home To Your Pet

How to Make a Leather Dog Collar

diy leather dog collar primal canine dog training

[Here's a great article we found on makezine.com, enjoy]Editor’s Note: The following DIY originally appeared in CRAFT Volume 10. Pictured above is author Ana Poe with her adorable pup Paco. Paco tragically passed away in January of 2009. RIP dear Paco. DIY Dog Collar Build a leather collar with style and substance. By Ana Poe i began working with leather seven years ago when I stumbled across it during the hunt for the perfect collar for my dog, Paco. Since I’ve never taken a class, most of the following techniques are either self-taught or passed on to me by old-time leather workers. When working with leather, remember that it falls under the same rules as wood, metal, and stone: measure twice, cut once, and when you can’t beat it, learn to work with it.

 

MATERIALS

Leather strip or piece of hide Collar template Buckle, D-ring, and rivets Water-based edge dye Leather conditioner I recommend a combination of mink oil, cream conditioner, and beeswax. Decorative studs and/or conchos Leather stamp and paints (optional) Using high-quality materials will pay off in the long run. Use brass hardware whenever possible (nickel finish is available) and start with a high-quality latigo leather. Originally used as horse tack, latigo leather is meant to tolerate sweat, dirt, and weather, and will not only stand the test of time but will look better doing so.

TOOLS

Ruler Strap cutter Mallet Tack hammer Leather scissors Small scissors Needlenose vise-grip pliers Skiver X-Acto knife Hole punch Scratch awl Screwdriver Rivet setter Edge beveler (optional) Some of these tools you may already have lying around your house. You can find the specialized tools online at tandyleatherfactory.com or at one of its many branches. If you need to speak to an expert leather worker, call up Chris Howard at the Michigan branch and tell him we sent you.

DIRECTIONS

Caution: The nature of leather tools — sharp! — means that your skin poses no serious obstacle. Use every tool appropriately and safely, and before you begin each step, watch where your hands are! dog-collar-figA.jpg Step 1: Strap-cut the hide. If you have a piece of hide, adjust the strap cutter to the width of the collar you want and run along the straight edge to create a strip from which you’ll cut the collar. You can also buy pre-cut strips from most leather suppliers. dog-collar-figB.jpg Step 2: Cut a generous length. To determine the length of leather to cut, take your dog’s exact neck measurement and add 10″. It’s a healthy measurement, and you may end up cutting off some excess, but while you can always subtract, you can never add. At both ends, crop off the corners for a finished look. dog-collar-figC.jpg Step 3: Bevel the edges (optional). Using a keen edge beveler, run the tool along the top corner of the leather to remove the edge. Repeat on all sides and ends. This step creates a more polished look and a comfortable fit for the dog. dog-collar-figD.jpg Step 4: Dye the edges. Select a water-based edge dye that matches the color of the leather you’re working with. Keep a wiping rag handy and use an applicator or specialized dispenser to cover the exposed edges with an even coat of dye. Take care not to drip over the leather, as the dye stains quickly. Step 5: Condition the leather. Taking the time to apply conditioners will extend the life of your leather goods. They can also bring an old leather product back to life. Apply mink oil and cream conditioner on a rag and, using your hand strength, work into the leather. To finish, wipe beeswax lightly onto the leather and then wipe off the excess. This last step protects the collar against water. dog-collar-figE.jpg Step 6: Mark the holes, and trim. Download the appropriate template from craftzine.com/10/doggone_collar. Take the side marked “buckle end” and slide it flush to the end of the leather. Use a scratch awl to mark the leather where indicated. For the tail end, follow the instructions on the template and line up the second hole at your dog’s exact neck size. Mark the leather at the end of the template, cut off the excess, and bevel and dye the end. dog-collar-figF.jpg Step 7: Skive the collar. Working from the suede underside of the leather, use the skiving tool to remove about half the thickness of the leather from the mark on the template to the buckle end. This step will remove bulk and make it easier for the leather to conform around the buckle. Step 8: Punch holes. The hole punch tool comes with many different head sizes, from #0 to #5. The template will tell you which size punch to use for each hole. When preparing to punch, always lay a scrap of leather underneath, as impact with a hard object can crack or bend the punch. dog-collar-figG.jpg Line up the punch, using the scratch awl mark as the center of a bulls-eye. With several firm whacks, use the mallet to depress the punch through the leather. Repeat until all holes are punched. dog-collar-figI.jpg Using an X-Acto blade, cut out the leather where indicated to create an oblong slot for the buckle. dog-collar-figJ.jpg Step 9: Add the buckle and rivets. Weave the punched leather through the buckle and fold the tail underneath. To set a rivet, push the male end of the rivet through both layers, from the bottom, and top it with the cap. dog-collar-figK.jpg Place the rivet-setting anvil on something hard, like a piece of marble. Select the appropriate anvil (it will be the slightly concave one the same size as your rivet cap) and use the mallet to set the rivet firmly. You cannot hit the rivet too hard! If you don’t set it firmly enough, the collar will fail, so if you’re not sure, tug the leather the same way your dog on a leash would, and reset the rivet if need be. Set the 2 rivets closest to the buckle first, slide on your D-ring, and set the remaining 2. Step 10: Decorate! Now comes the fun part. Select your decorations and map out their placement on the collar. Mark the leather by using the actual decoration itself (apply pressure to make a mark) or a scratch awl. For studs, it helps to lock them in a pair of needlenose vise-grips so you can easily mark both tails at once. dog-collar-figL.jpg Decorations attach to the leather in 1 of 3 ways: screw-back, rivet-back, or tails. For screw-back conchos, use a #4 or #5 hole punch, punch the hole, and then screw into place. For added security, apply a drop of threadlocker on the backing. For rivet-back decorations, use a #0 punch and the appropriate setting tools. Without machinery, setting rivet decorations securely enough for daily wear while simultaneously not damaging the decoration can be tricky, so we recommend staying away from rivet-backs if you can help it. dog-collar-figM.jpg For studs, cut parallel holes with an X-Acto blade, push the stud through the holes, turn the tails in with a screwdriver or pliers, and then gently tap with a tack hammer. Studs are an easy way to add a lot of flash to a collar, like spelling out a dog’s name, that’s sturdy enough to last. There are also a variety of leather-stamping tools on the market as well as paints and finishes, so you can stamp shapes or re-create your favorite 70s belt. Leather working can be challenging, but the reward of creating a piece of art that can potentially outlive you or your dog is worth it. Most leather workers are more than happy to share techniques and solutions if you find yourself stuck, so don’t be afraid to call on us! Note: Most leather decorations are calibrated for the thickness of leather, so if you want a vegan option, the best thing to do is start with a pre-made vegan belt that measures at least ¼” thick. Treat it like a strip of leather, as all the tools and instructions stay the same. dog-collar-closing-shot.jpg About the Author: Ana Poe is the owner of Paco Collars, maker of custom handmade leather dog collars. Ana’s been working professionally with dogs since 2001. She has a B.A. in art practice from UC Berkeley and is an all around smart cookie.

Daily Training Tips: Beginner Obedience Heel-to-Sit

primal canine bay area dog training

Here's a quick video on how we introduce the sit command to new dogs during a heel. Count comes from an amazing bloodline (Homie Blood) but was kept in a backyard most of his life, so he had no idea of the real world and when he was introduced to it he froze. We took a couple weeks to re-imprint and socialize him with the pack now he is in first steps of our training program and has come ALLLLLONG way!..

Like i tell all of my clients there is no bad dogs, there is just bad or miseducated owners. In my pack i have no clean slates or working line bred dogs, we take pound puppies and turn them into full fledged service dogs or in some cases protection dogs. This is where the Primal Canine Philosophy comes in, we re-work the nerves and train these dogs with compassion and communicate with them the way you should.

For more information on Primal Canine or to get a FREE evaluation five us a call at 408.250.0026.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeG1aT8RBqI&w=853&h=480]

Caring For Your Pets in Warm Weather - Infographic

Don't Lock Me

Heat can be a tricky thing for dogs, some dogs do just fine in the heat in fact some thrive but on the other side some dogs could suffer extreme health issues when over exposed to heat. Here is a great infographic on your pets and heat. One rule of thumb we tell our clients when it comes to heat is if you don't think a baby would be comfy in that situation then for sure you puppy wont! ..

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Pet Anxiety - Infographic

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pet anxiety bay area dog training primal canine

Introducing a New Dog to Your Pack - Video

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The introduction of a new dog to a home with existing dogs can be a bit tricky and should be taken very seriously. When introducing a new dog to your current pack there are a few things to take into consideration.. 1. Are you your current dog(s) pack leader? - A dog without a strong stable pack leader will feel the need to go out of their way to protect the pack and may lash out on the new addition. Also a dog that is not sure in their leader will under go a huge amount of stress which is not good for your dog health.

2. Do you use a crate?- A crate is the safest way to introduce a dog into a household with a current dog or dogs, this way your newest member will feel safe and secure in their crate while your dogs can see and smell them without any threat of a fight.

3. Does your current dog(s) display dog aggression?- This maybe one of the most crucial parts to take into consideration and is best to be dealt with before you add a new dog into your house. The best way to deal with this is to contact your local dog trainer for some advice and training classes, remember not all dogs have to like each other but ALL dogs must display manners when around other dogs.

There is much more to add to this short post, so if you're interested in adding a new dog to your pack please contact us at info@primalcanine.com or to set up your FREE evaluation please contact us at 408.915.6173

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJ3uBkyASdE&w=853&h=480]

45 Animals That Are Pumped For The 4th Of July

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We found these great pictures on buzz feed.com and wanted to share them with you.

1. This dog that’s draped in the American flag.

This dog that's draped in the American flag.

Source: i.imgur.com

2. This bulldog with giant American flag pants.

This bulldog with giant American flag pants.

Source: i.imgur.com

3. This guinea pig that’s trying to be all that he can be.

This guinea pig that's trying to be all that he can be.

Source: i.imgur.com

4. This patriotic dachshund.

This patriotic dachshund.

Source: i.imgur.com

5. This hedgehog that’s showing his true patriotic colors.

This hedgehog that's showing his true patriotic colors.

6. This adorable horse with an American flag bow.

This adorable horse with an American flag bow.

Source: i.imgur.com

7. This cat complete with red, white and blue bandanna.

This cat complete with red, white and blue bandanna.

Source: i.imgur.com

8. This patriotic pair of dogs.

This patriotic pair of dogs.

Source: i.imgur.com

9. This puppy that’s doing his best to wave Old Glory.

This puppy that's doing his best to wave Old Glory.

Source: i.imgur.com

10. These two bloodhounds.

These two bloodhounds.

Source: vh1.com

11. This parrot.

This parrot.

12. This red, white, and blue dog.

This red, white, and blue dog.

Although he kind of looks like the French tricolor in reverse, its heart is in the right place.

Source: vh1.com

13. This chihuahua with an epic ‘murica hat.

This chihuahua with an epic 'murica hat.

Source: omtimes.com

14. This cat that covers itself with patriotism.

This cat that covers itself with patriotism.

15. This yellow lab.

This yellow lab.

16. Even this dolphin is getting in on all the 4th of July America feels.

Even this dolphin is getting in on all the 4th of July America feels.

17. This musical patriot cat.

This musical patriot cat.

18. This llama.

This llama.

19. THIS HORSE!

THIS HORSE!

20. This cat that just can’t get enough America paraphernalia

This cat that just can't get enough America paraphernalia

21. This Uncle Sam cat.

This Uncle Sam cat.

22. This kitten that’s just screaming about how much it loves America.

This kitten that's just screaming about how much it loves America.

23. This dog that’s resting in a sea of American flags.

This dog that's resting in a sea of American flags.

Source: aldf.org

24. This dog who got its nails done for the 4th.

This dog who got its nails done for the 4th.

Source: mike2.com

25. Pigs, too, can show their patriotism.

Pigs, too, can show their patriotism.

Source: teen.com

26. This cat who, by the look on its face, is ready to defend the USA from all who would threaten it.

This cat who, by the look on its face, is ready to defend the USA from all who would threaten it.

27. This bulldog who’s readying itself for a transatlantic flight to prove America’s dominance.

This bulldog who's readying itself for a transatlantic flight to prove America's dominance.

28. This dog with America shades.

This dog with America shades.

29. Another dachshund, this one is ready to fight for our freedoms.

Another dachshund, this one is ready to fight for our freedoms.

30. This America-cat.

This America-cat.

31. This bulldog that’s just elated to be holding an American flag.

This bulldog that's just elated to be holding an American flag.

32. This happy trio of dogs.

This happy trio of dogs.

Source: sdhumane.org

33. This adorable little guy who won’t let his disability stop him from joining in on the 4th of July fun.

This adorable little guy who won't let his disability stop him from joining in on the 4th of July fun.

34. This dude (or dudette).

This dude (or dudette).

35. This puppy that’s just challenging you to slight America in his presence.

This puppy that's just challenging you to slight America in his presence.

36. This America-star dog.

This America-star dog.

37. This ferret.

This ferret.

Source: vh1.com

38. And his buddy.

And his buddy.

Source: vh1.com

39. This lizard.

This lizard.

Source: vh1.com

40. This ever-vigilant cat.

This ever-vigilant cat.

41. This sheep.

This sheep.

42. This squirrel that just can’t get enough of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

This squirrel that just can't get enough of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

43. That squirrel’s friend who’s posing with the flag.

That squirrel's friend who's posing with the flag.

44. And their mutual friend who’s cheering them on while wearing an America hat.

And their mutual friend who's cheering them on while wearing an America hat.

45. And last but not least, this poodle.

And last but not least, this poodle.

The Pet Food Pyramid - INFOGRAPHIC

pet-food-pyramid- primal canine dog  san jose training

Here's a nice infographic breaking down what type of foods and amounts your pet will probably need. Keep in mind all dogs are different as well as cats depending on your pet these amounts and types will need to be adjusted. The best way to see what works for your pet is to experiment with their diets using quality whole foods. Remember your dogs food should be just that FOOD.

pet-food-pyramid- primal canine dog training

TDIF!

PRIMAL CANINE BAY AREA DOG TRAINING TDIF

PRIMAL CANINE BAY AREA DOG TRAINING TDIF